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Constipation Treatments

Cat constipation and dog constipation is less common than diarrhoea. Using liquid paraffin in the diet is not your only option, palatable pastes such as Katalax and treats such as Defurr Um can also be bought making life a whole lot easier for you and your cat......

Katalax 20g Tube Cat Laxative Paste

Katalax 20g Tube Cat Laxative Paste

£18.19

Katalax Tube Cat Laxative Paste is a palatable combination of white soft paraffin; cod liver oil and malt extract. Aids in the elimination of hairballs. For the on going treatment of mild...[More info]

£18.19
VetIQ Healthy Bites Hairball Remedy Treats For Cats 65g

VetIQ Healthy Bites Hairball Remedy Treats For Cats 65g

£1.24

VetIQ Healthy Bites Hairball Remedy Treats For Cats are nutritional, tasty snack with a creamy tasty filling that contains active ingredients to help prevent and remove hairballs in...[More info]

£1.24
VetIQ Defurr-UM Hairball Remedy for Cats 70g

VetIQ Defurr-UM Hairball Remedy for Cats 70g

£3.41

VetIQ Defurr-UM Hairball Remedy for Cats helps aid in preventing the formation of hairballs in cats and kittens as well as helping in the removal of any which have already been...[More info]

£3.41
Laxapet 50g Tube Cat Dog Laxative

Laxapet 50g Tube Cat Dog Laxative

£8.24

Laxapet Tube Cat Dog Laxative is a highly palatable gel which as well as being a hairball and constipation remedy, also contains supplemental vitamins, fish oil and lecithin. Suitable for...[More info]

£8.24
Vetoquinol Care Hairball Care Boli-Stop for Cats 120g

Vetoquinol Care Hairball Care Boli-Stop for Cats 120g

£14.20

Vetoquinol Care Hairball Care Boli-Stop for Cats is a complementary feeding stuff to aid in the management of hairballs in cats. Foreign material such as hair can cause obstructions, but...[More info]

£14.20
Lax A Past Feline Laxative 70g Tube

Lax A Past Feline Laxative 70g Tube

£7.97

Lax A Past Feline Laxative Tube makes the going easy.  Palatable paste to aid the elimination of hairballs in cats. Laxapast contains yeast, lecithin, vitamin E and cod liver oil. Can be...[More info]

£7.97
Beaphar 2 in 1 Hairball Paste

Beaphar 2 in 1 Hairball Paste

£2.78

Beaphar 2 in 1 Hairball Paste is a completely unique dual action remedy for cats that suffer with hairball problems. This fantastic paste helps to ease the passage of the hairballs through...[More info]

£2.78
Johnson's Hairball Remedy 50g

Johnson's Hairball Remedy 50g

£2.77

Johnson’s Hairball Remedy is an easily digestible paste, proven to aid in the prevention of hairballs in kittens and cats. The malt-flavoured taste allows for easy administration. For...[More info]

£2.77
CatMalt Laxacat 50g

CatMalt Laxacat 50g

£5.46

CatMalt Laxacat can be used for the treatment of hairballs. Certain cats can be predisposed towards the accumulation of hair in the stomach (hairballs). Administer 2-3cm of Cat Malt 2 times...[More info]

£5.46
Petkin Lickstick Hairball Remedy for Cats

Petkin Lickstick Hairball Remedy for Cats

£3.56

Petkin Lickstick Hairball Remedy for Cats is the best way to help your cat eliminate the problems of hairballs, without all the mess and fuss. This fantastic natural malt flavoured...[More info]

£3.56

At some point during their lives, most dogs become constipated. If your dog seems to be straining yet cannot pass a stool, or if the stool is exceptionally hard, he's probably constipated. It’s usually nothing to worry about but if the constipation lasts more than a few days you should take action. Observe your dog closely to be certain that he is straining to defecate rather than urinate. Difficulty in urinating can be life threatening and you will need to seek medical help immediately.

Perhaps the most frequent cause of ‘simple’ constipation in dogs is a lack of fibre in the diet, eating the wrong foods such as rich meat from human plates or scraps from the dustbin or from dehydration. Try changing your dog’s diet by adding fibre to his food. You can buy special high fibre diets that will result in better colon motility. Alternatively you can just add fibre to his diet in the form of 100% bran cereal. Try not to make sudden changes to your dog’s diet but instead gradually change the diet over a period of a few days. Some colons will perform better if the stool is smaller. To achieve this, a high digestibility, low ash residue diet is used. With this diet a larger proportion of nutrients are absorbed by the dog' resulting in a lower volume of stool.

Monitor the water intake of any dog you suspect to be constipated. Generally dogs need, at minimum, one ounce of water per pound (about 0.03 litres per 0.45 kg) of body weight per day. If a dog is very active and in hot weather, its water requirements go up. If the dog drinks less than these suggested amounts, dehydration as a possible cause for constipation.

Eating items like rocks, gravel, fabric, bones, dirt, toys, or plant material can also cause constipation. A small object generally passes in a day or two but if the objects are abnormally large or could injure the dog while trying to pass them, it may require surgery to remove them. Other causes of a bowl blockage include excessive licking of the fur that can cause hairballs to form, which can block the colon. You should find and treat the cause of the excess licking to totally eradicate the problem.

Dogs that are older may lack muscle tone in the rectum, which can mean the dog will not push hard enough. Stool can back up and harden in the bowel, making it more difficult for the dog with poor muscle tone to do his business. It can help to soak the dog’s food with water so that stool is naturally softer, since discomfort upon producing a hard stool can result in withholding stools.

An enlarged prostate gland may be the problem in older male dogs. As it enlarges, it presses against the colon, narrowing the pathway. Alternatively, there could be a tumour on the prostate gland, which also narrows the colon. Neutering the dog and/or removing the tumour will usually correct these problems.

A simple, isolated episode can be treated with a stool softener. Read and follow the label directions carefully to be sure you do not overdose your dog. An old remedy for lubricating the colon that is still in use today is mineral oil. Veterinarians usually advise mixing it in with food rather than feeding raw. Be sure and follow dosage instructions to the letter to avoid further complications.

Obstipation is the more correct medical terminology when dealing with a chronic constipation problem. When obstipated, the dog is unable to empty the colon without outside help. The obstipated colon will dilate and fill with an enormous volume of rock-hard feces. The dog is extremely uncomfortable, with frequent unproductive straining. If the colon is not cleared, the dog can become lethargic, lose his appetite, and begin to vomit. Once you know this is a problem for your dog, get him to your vet as soon as possible.

Disclaimer: The above article is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a veterinarian nor is the source to be used as a diagnostic tool as there may be various conditions that may resemble the descriptions provided.